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Teacher Virtual Workshop: Slow Looking and Hokusai - Shared screen with speaker view
KELLEY YANG
16:37
MD!
Yuan Liu
28:36
Hello from Maryland
Jennifer Reifsteck
38:32
https://asia.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/EVE202103-WS1-for-Hokusai-Slow-Looking_FA.pdf
Sherwood Williams
39:26
Can I ask why you would provide the worksheet to students after they had observed the image (rather than ask students to write things about the image while they are doing the looking)?
Jennifer Reifsteck
40:24
Thank you for your question, Sherwood. Faylinda will address this at the end of her presentation.
Sally Lau
42:28
I see the link as a pdf file. How does one record our thoughts?
Jennifer Reifsteck
43:10
HI Sally. You can record your thoughts on a separate piece of paper.
Sally Lau
43:45
Thanks
Lisa Winton
50:59
Woodblock of a figure perched on a tree contemplating the scene while playing a musical instrument during Spring.
Jill Brackett
51:02
I was amazed at how I continued to noticed new things as time progressed. going back areas multiple times there was more each time.
Colleen Wampole
51:20
I noticed how everything seems designed to flow. The softened edges of that snow on the peak seems to echo the river’s direction. It makes me interpret it as snow melt and runoff
Debora Southwell
51:55
I think a message of the painting speaks of nature’s elements of power and calm. and the artist used balance: distance/near, temperature of cold/warmth, age of mtn. vs. the youth
Lisa Winton
52:01
Theme: Meditation on the beauty of art and the wold.
Nathalie Peter
52:06
I feel the serenity and majesty of nature appreciated by a boy pausing to notice
Lisa Winton
52:07
world
Julie Corriveau
52:20
The figure is playing to the silent mt. The water was musical rhythem and the tree elevates the flute player to be a bird.
Sherwood Williams
52:33
I notice that you don't provide any background on the art, so I assume that you don't want students to have that. My students will want to go straight to Wikipedia to get the standard line on the art (sometimes using Google's reverse image-search). Do you tell students specifically not to do that? How would the background inflect their experience of the art?
Yuan Liu
53:03
I can hear the flute music the boy is playing, the water flowing in the stream
Noelle Avakian
53:03
I was perplexed by the repeating image under the tree
BIJU KATTAPURAM
53:24
I thought the young boy? was fishing
Sally Lau
53:24
The innocence of a youthful observation of the beauty of nature and child’s perspective and meditative feelings
Kimiyo Watanabe
53:42
I think the black part in the sky is just a cloud, not smoke from Mt. Fuji.
Ioan Paul Colta
53:57
It is a very zen painting on my view.
Jill Brackett
54:03
I saw it as a cloud too
Ana Chuquizuta
54:12
I see a man looking at the mountains with an scene of warriors.
Lisa Winton
54:22
Message: Balance between mt. in the background, tree in the foreground, figure balanced on the tree, old age of mt. and youth of figure.
Julie Corriveau
54:25
The students will gain more from the lack of a 'face' on which focus.
Nathalie Peter
55:13
I wonder what he is playing as he gazes a such a wondrous scene
Jenny Peng Windheim
56:21
The powerful lines of the mountain is the starting point for other formal decisions. The bank and the cascading water mirror the right side of the mountain. The tree trunk follows along the left side of the mountain in curve and counter curve.
Sherwood Williams
56:22
The experience of the painting is very different if you access an image that allows you to pick up more detail (if we could see the figure more clearly, we would see the flute more sharply, for example, which I had trouble seeing in the image that we got)
janet Luu
56:46
When you first look at the painting it is just a beautiful picture then the more you observe the pairing the more details you recognize, then the third stage was you get into the stage of a peaceful mind of the artist. Then I started transform myself into the painting.
Vic Bradford
57:18
A notably small moment in time, a small person dwarfed by the scene, yet the capacity to consciously observe is vast
Kat Wichmann
57:23
Is it possible to send us the image so we can zoom in? Or is there a way to do it on Zoom?
Kat Wichmann
58:40
totally different! cheers
Ana Chuquizuta
58:55
a Jocker ?
Kat Wichmann
01:02:40
Cooked lobster color
janet Luu
01:02:52
water color
Namrata Ganneri
01:02:59
red
Liz Evans
01:03:04
charcoal, reds
Susan Friedman
01:03:07
tans, red, browns
Nathalie Peter
01:03:11
red gray black cream
Jeanne Wolf
01:03:12
Red black brown tans
Julie Corriveau
01:03:14
grey and black, red and orange
DMS
01:03:17
Cinnabar?
Ioan Paul Colta
01:03:18
sumi ink
Jill Brackett
01:03:18
yes cooked lobster!lol
Reginald Pointer
01:03:19
The red has a strong presenc
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:03:27
I think he used only black ink and red ink.
Yuan Liu
01:03:28
different shades of brown
Sally Lau
01:03:56
Orange seems to convey fire & dark grey in form of a stormy cloud or smoke
Reginald Pointer
01:03:58
White or light coming for below
Julie Corriveau
01:04:05
heat, explosion, dread
Marilyn Hazelton
01:04:09
embattlement, emergence, chaos
Nathalie Peter
01:04:21
ominous and yet his face is musing
Marilyn Hazelton
01:04:24
and calm
janet Luu
01:04:31
Powerful
Namrata Ganneri
01:04:32
knotty problems
Yuan Liu
01:04:34
Movement
Jill Brackett
01:04:39
ferocity
Henny Tanudjaja
01:04:40
I feel compassion toward the figure. Look at his face. It is not hatred.
Lisa Winton
01:04:41
theatrical image of devil and opposite of prior print
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:04:44
Was the paper already framed with the silk border or mounted later?
Liz Evans
01:04:47
intensity
Reginald Pointer
01:04:47
Also somewhat yin yang feel
Nathalie Peter
01:04:48
storminess
Susan Friedman
01:05:05
feelings come from image rather than the color
Margaret Carpenter
01:05:28
Energy of the creature, something superhuman with the hovering. The “wave
Colleen Wampole
01:05:30
those red lines seem like projectiles or rays. they go through the figure’s arm and cloth
Nathalie Peter
01:05:36
swirling and straight
Barbara Bury
01:05:37
Two red lines piercing the belly
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:05:38
juxtaposition of curvilinear and jagged angular lines
Marilyn Hazelton
01:05:42
curling, slanting and thin, upward, downward
Sally Lau
01:05:55
Lines give feeling of turbulence & anger
Yuan Liu
01:06:20
Flying, in charge, controling
Liz Evans
01:06:20
very intentional
Reginald Pointer
01:06:21
Some short lines in each hand ( are they drum sticks)
Vic Bradford
01:06:27
movement preparing to enter an abyss
Julie Corriveau
01:06:33
The straight lines firing form direct directions within the explosion add to the disorder
Lisa Winton
01:06:39
strong diaganols in figure and amorphous shapes in background
Margaret Carpenter
01:06:42
FLOATING is suggested by the circular arcs
Ioan Paul Colta
01:06:45
menacing straight red lines
Liz Evans
01:06:59
convey motion and flight
janet Luu
01:07:01
Feeling scare
Reginald Pointer
01:07:08
Curvy lines created in garment
Yuan Liu
01:07:46
Heavy of muscle, light of cloth
Marilyn Hazelton
01:08:09
background and foreground are at odds
Colleen Wampole
01:08:15
the lines of the seal are the most simple and straightforward lines in the whole thing
Margaret Carpenter
01:08:26
The shading, angling of ribbons suggests motion, disorder, movement
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:08:52
Top half of the fame is very dense , in contrast to the emptiness of the bottom half
Nathalie Peter
01:09:00
gnarly body, tattered clothing, soft yet ominous clouds
Reginald Pointer
01:09:03
One arm seems to create curve other is more straight angle
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:10:25
Compositionally, top half of the frame is very dense with colors and form, in contrast to the emptiness of the bottom half
Margaret Carpenter
01:11:27
I’m noticing how a center of gravity goes to the lighter shading of his belly to anchor the figure
Kat Wichmann
01:11:32
Seems like a god of thunder and lightning
Marilyn Hazelton
01:11:46
the paler red on the face and abdomen may indicate vulnerabilities
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:11:52
If it weren’t for Hokusai’s seal at the bottom half, the whole composition would be off balanced.
Sally Lau
01:11:56
Shapes are very 3 dimensional giving fierceness & movement
Nathalie Peter
01:12:04
It's interesting to look at the shape of the black clouds then white clouds - each evoke a different feeling in me
Margaret Carpenter
01:12:16
Nice, Jenny!
Liz Evans
01:12:27
the curve of the spiral shadow and the curve of the upper arm seem to balance each other
Reginald Pointer
01:12:46
Curved somewhat flower like shape behind back of figure? Not sure what that is?
Jill Brackett
01:13:51
is he diving into a white cloud from a dark area or its a light background with dark clouds....I saw it differently like he is about to leap down and in
Marilyn Hazelton
01:13:55
the signature is unusual
Yuan Liu
01:13:58
The tail-like shape of the cloud
Sally Lau
01:14:05
Contrast between circularity and movements of figure in clouds
Nathalie Peter
01:14:20
an umbrella, parachute?
Vic Bradford
01:14:31
Active shapes and textures, combined and contrasted with the impression of emptiness, make me wonder about the intention of the figure as the figure encounters this situation
Sally Lau
01:14:42
Shapes are intertwining
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:14:46
The “S” curve composition is alluding to the Taoist yin-Yang symbol, same as Hokusai’s symbol for himself in his signature.
Liz Evans
01:14:46
the figure reminds me of lava and the signature reminds me of a fountain
Selena Fox
01:15:32
Nature Spirit in motion with Spiral of Life
Nathalie Peter
01:15:55
I wonder what will happen next
Reginald Pointer
01:16:17
There’s a storm coming?
Kimiyo Watanabe
01:16:21
The ribbon shape fabric on the top of the figure seems shows stronger wind blow than the “ribbon” around the legs of the figure.
Yuan Liu
01:16:34
The heavy shape on the top right corner balanced with the emptiness on the bottom left. It looks like the figure is flying down from heaven.
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:16:36
Source of light is coming from below the “demon”, it’s coming from Hokusai’s signature which the demon is looking at.
Monica Alcantar
01:16:41
Hello, could you repeat the reference for the analysis categories. Thank you
Marilyn Hazelton
01:16:48
this calming because the character is on our side, a protector
Margaret Carpenter
01:17:30
Nathalie, I like that “question!” Definitely tones, angle, position indicates that whatever is below is SUBJECT to what the figure will impart
Reginald Pointer
01:17:38
Ribbon of fabric over the leg is half yin yang
DMS
01:18:02
I wonder if there was European influence here- because of similarity to Zeus who evolved into Christian art and also in the Creation of Adam….
Jill Brackett
01:19:22
his belly looks like the drum
Margaret Carpenter
01:19:32
I now see “drumsticks” instead of “blades”
Selena Fox
01:19:36
Now notice drum sticks
Jeanne Wolf
01:19:43
Looks like a man and like a god.
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:19:54
I see the self reference - the Thunder God looking at Hokusai’s signature, which is the source of light in this painting.
Henny Tanudjaja
01:19:58
No wonder he looks kind. He is Hokusai.
Susan Friedman
01:20:03
Yes the story explains that the figure is in the sky, explains the cloud
Mai Khanh Nguyen
01:20:07
Yes and no— that’s the beauty of this exercise. Letting us interpret and question and critical think on our own
Nathalie Peter
01:20:16
the tail in the cloud now becomes a tornado about to be unleashed
Margaret Carpenter
01:20:28
Wow, I LOVE that this is now suggesting SOUND as well as fury!
Marilyn Hazelton
01:20:53
He walked from his home to was it Edo when he was very old, his feet are showing that experience
Reginald Pointer
01:21:31
Does the artist see himself as closer to heaven
Marilyn Hazelton
01:21:36
what kind of characters are involved in the signature?
Lisa Winton
01:21:49
Do you ever play music evocative of the work of art during the discussion?
Margaret Carpenter
01:23:13
This exercise shows me how to use wait time and collaborative observation/analysis/sharing. I ALWAYS get more out of the comments of others with opportunities that Faylinda helps others learn. SLOW LOOKING- YES!
Jennifer Reifsteck
01:24:09
Thank you for your question, Marilyn, about the characters on the Thunder god painting. I forgot to mention that the signature states man mad about painting. Hokusai's favorite medium was painting.
DMS
01:24:57
https://www.loc.gov/static/programs/teachers/getting-started-with-primary-sources/documents/Analyzing_Primary_Sources.pdf
DMS
01:25:15
I like the activity from a teaching history perspective as well!
Jennifer Reifsteck
01:25:20
HI Lisa. Thank you for your question about music. When I share the Thunder god with students, I often show a video of taiko drummers.
Marilyn Hazelton
01:33:29
Slow looking and sketching could be used with photographs also, both newspaper, textbook and persona.
Margaret Carpenter
01:34:20
I appreciate Faylinda pointing out that slow looking is meeting the TIMES we’re in with our students online.
Marilyn Hazelton
01:34:23
personal, especially for ancetry exploration
Reginald Pointer
01:34:34
Do you have student comment with just their thoughts or elements of art getting addressed
Robin Puett
01:34:34
has this been done with something more science-y - like looking at a figure or graph or table?
Kimiyo Watanabe
01:34:40
could you talk about the history of slow looking—how it was developed?
Marilyn Hazelton
01:35:28
Yes, so the boy seeing volcano / volcano seeing boy was painted while Japan was isolated from the wider world . . .
BoBeen Chung
01:35:53
This might be a good resource on slow looking: http://www.pz.harvard.edu/resources/slow-looking-the-art-and-practice-of-learning-through-observation
Kimiyo Watanabe
01:36:19
How common is this practice?
Margaret Carpenter
01:36:45
Therapeutic to slow look. I appreciate this PLATFORM to COLLABORATIVELY slow look and appreciate out loud. So I’m curious if the Freer or other art museums are offering more mornings like THIS to bring folks together for the shared experience. Now that the nation is ZOOMING as never before, it unleashes some more possibilities.
Margaret Carpenter
01:37:06
Got it! Google “slow looking!” Thanks!
DMS
01:37:21
I am curious if you have companion lesson plans or extension activities like pigments, Japanese nationalism, European-Japanese-Mainland Korea/China contact & influence? Geography & local vs global resources and their impact on paintings? You probably know about the Harvard Museums pigment collection and podcast feature- I was thinking about that when observing the colors. Really great presentation. I’m glad that I took the time to be here and to make subtle and more dynamic works of Hokusai a priority.
Simone Raskin
01:39:12
Another source: Shari Tishman’s book: Slow Looking: the Art and Practice of Learning Through Observation
DMS
01:39:43
Faylinda, I really really appreciate your calm patient demeanor - it is really a well developed skill to be this grounded and to put - as someone above put it- wait time first alongside introspection. Wow. Thank you- you managed to captivate with clear cues and instructions and a well facilitated experience.
Reginald Pointer
01:42:44
Most artwork does not allow for touching, so I’m curious if there is the opportunity for persons with visual impairment issues the option to slow connection with touch ? Some painting have textures. When I was young I recall touching a print (in my home) that had raised ink marks. Can someone touch printing plates?
BoBeen Chung
01:47:36
Explore the Freer and Sackler’s Hokusai website: https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/hokusai-mad-about-painting/
Susan Schmidt
01:47:42
Crystal Bridges ‘touching tours’ have created prints with added texture to some of their paintings.
Margaret Carpenter
01:48:02
Thanks for this reference: https://harvardartmuseums.org/tour/a-history-of-color-an-audio-tour-of-the-forbes-pigment-collection
BoBeen Chung
01:48:47
Today’s Hokusai and Slow Looking Lesson Plan: https://asia.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/EVE202103-LP-Hokusai-and-Slow-Looking_FA.pdf
Marilyn Hazelton
01:48:49
This has been wonderful!
BoBeen Chung
01:48:55
Hokusai and Slow Looking Worksheet: https://asia.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/EVE202103-WS1-for-Hokusai-Slow-Looking_FA.pdf
Lisa Winton
01:49:03
Thanks for a marvelous program. I love the zoom feature to highlight details of the works of art.
BoBeen Chung
01:49:05
Faylinda’s work of art – Boy Viewing Mount Fuji: https://asia.si.edu/object/F1898.110/Jenn’s work of art – Thunder God: https://asia.si.edu/object/F1900.47/
Kimiyo Watanabe
01:49:21
Question about the Boy playing the flute, are the horizontal lines of the picture the damage from rolling the scroll?
DMS
01:49:22
You’re welcome in re Harvard Museums pigment exhibit! Also, Josetsu is an interesting keyword- that gourd is famous.
BoBeen Chung
01:49:47
Explore the Freer and Sackler’s Hokusai website: https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/hokusai-mad-about-painting/
Reginald Pointer
01:50:18
Thank you for all of this it was very informative and of great benefit for me and my teaching going forward
Suzanne Green
01:50:21
Thank you for today!
BoBeen Chung
01:51:15
Today’s Hokusai and Slow Looking Lesson Plan: https://asia.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/EVE202103-LP-Hokusai-and-Slow-Looking_FA.pdfHokusai and Slow Looking Worksheet: https://asia.si.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/EVE202103-WS1-for-Hokusai-Slow-Looking_FA.pdf
Susan Schmidt
01:53:34
The Asian Art Museum has one of the best education sites in the country. Thank you!
janet Luu
01:53:38
This is wonderful, I would like to attend more art classes like this. Are there any classes like art appreciation or workshop like this offered by Freer or other art museums ?
Robin Puett
01:53:41
Amazing session! Thank you!
BIJU KATTAPURAM
01:53:52
Very good. thanks
BoBeen Chung
01:54:01
Hi Janet - we will share that information with you in few minutes!
BoBeen Chung
01:54:12
School programs are completely virtual this school year. Check out our virtual K-12 field trip options: https://asia.si.edu/visit/live-online-learning-programs/
Noelle Avakian
01:54:12
Thank You!!!!!
Faylinda Kodis
01:55:05
My students have participated i a Freer field trip virtually and they loved it along with learning deeply.
Margaret Carpenter
01:55:11
AWESOME web site from Freer! THANK YOU! People probably know this, but you can “download” the chat to gather the web addresses shared. Look next to where you type comments… FILE or the (three dots) menu. I don’t believe the chat is every saved in the RECORDING of the program.
BoBeen Chung
01:55:41
Thank you for that Margaret!
BoBeen Chung
01:55:52
“Teaching China with the Smithsonian.” Teaching China was designed for educators in grades 5-12 for language arts, social studies, and visual arts content areas: https://www.asia.si.edu/teachingchina
Yuan Liu
01:56:48
Fantastic workshop! Thank you so much Jenn, Faylinda and BooBee!
Margaret Carpenter
01:57:01
These resources/sharings are some of the BEST things that have come out of the pandemic, RIGHT? Bless your good work!
Sherwood Williams
01:57:28
I'm grateful for this workshop too!
BoBeen Chung
01:57:48
Share your reflective thoughts and responses here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s8-jyhZ5xTTPU5I1mr3NOVa1FCQRM9eNOedcIXBLTLc/edit?usp=sharing
Jenny Peng Windheim
01:57:58
Appreciate your “Teaching China” program; a way to counter bias against Asians so much more prevalent these days.
Deniz Karakas
01:58:28
Thank you! This was a very insightful session.
Sally Lau
01:58:32
Excellent, very informative & inspirational lessons on slow looking with Hokusai at Freer with you.Thank you so much
janet Luu
01:58:57
Can the field trip tour conducted in Chinese for some Chinese learners ?
Jennifer Reifsteck
01:59:02
Share your reflective thoughts and responses here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s8-jyhZ5xTTPU5I1mr3NOVa1FCQRM9eNOedcIXBLTLc/edit?usp=sharing
Kimiyo Watanabe
01:59:16
Question about the Boy and Fuji, are the horizontal lines the damage by rolling the scroll?
Gale Awaya McCallum
01:59:49
A huge treat - thank you so much!
Liz Evans
02:00:12
this was wonderful, thank you.
BoBeen Chung
02:00:17
Thank you for joining us for this workshop today! Please take a minute to fill out this short survey and let us know your thoughts about today’s virtual teacher workshop: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5740202/Virtual-Teacher-Workshops-FY20-Survey
BoBeen Chung
02:00:48
Follow @freersackler on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and subscribe to our emails for the latest news and programs: https://s.si.edu/2wKzXHJ
Colleen Wampole
02:00:50
Thank you for this experience today!
Ioan Paul Colta
02:01:12
Thank you very much ! Kind regards from Romania.
Yuan Liu
02:01:31
This is great! Congratulations on such a successful workshop!
BoBeen Chung
02:01:33
Stay tuned for future teacher PD workshops at the Freer and Sackler Galleries! Next one is on May 18th: https://asia.si.edu/learn/for-educators/professional-development/Stay safe everyone!
Simone Raskin
02:01:34
Thank you very much. From France!
Namrata Ganneri
02:01:34
thanks. regards from Mumbai.
Vic Bradford
02:02:00
Thank you for this wonderful approach to perception
Theresa Zischkin
02:02:10
Great workshop, thank you! Regards from Austria!
Sally Lau
02:02:15
Amazing! Thank you and very inspired by this educational slow looking technique.
Margaret Carpenter
02:02:37
Congratulations and THANK YOU for today’s work and the follow-on resources. What lovely teamwork and expertise to share with us educators. Thanks to all participants, too!
janet Luu
02:02:38
Thank you very much. Looking forward to have more art programs in the future.